Blog

"Here you will find a library of blog posts that will help you gain a better understanding of Sol and what it means to live Life in Real Time."

The challenges of the aging population will be greatly mitigated by an expanding, young, immigrant workforce.
Thursday, February 21, 2013

Since the November election, there has been much talk in Washington and on the pundit circuit about America's changing demographics, especially the "Latino vote" and the new realities of political campaigning. There has also been considerable wrangling over immigration and what it means for a country that is a nation of immigrants but is more crowded than it once was.

The immigration debate is significant to America's politics and culture, but it is also crucial to the country's economics, a subject that receives too little attention. Let's be blunt: The future wealth and well-being of the American people—the country's economic security, national security, business innovation, GDP growth and status in the global marketplace—require a comprehensive solution to the chronic problems caused by a broken immigration policy. In particular, the status of 11 million unauthorized Latino immigrants now living here must be resolved.

The economics are simple: Latinos spur demand. Seventy percent of the nation's gross domestic product is fueled by consumer spending. That means the Latino population—large, growing and increasingly prosperous—will play a key role in America's economic future.

Latinos are now by far the country's biggest minority-market segment. Including unauthorized residents, the Latino population now exceeds 54 million (not counting nearly four million in Puerto Rico). Blacks, in second place, number 39 million. The Latino population has increased...

The 2016 presidential race focuses on immigration as candidates and the media miss a much bigger story.
Sunday, March 13, 2016

We are business leaders and we are here to tell you a surprising truth: Latinos are big drivers of economic growth. Unless you run a retail business, you probably have no idea what we mean. Few on the campaign trail or in the media ever talk about Latinos and economic growth. The candidates and reporters have a hard time getting past immigration.

Voters are making choices about the nation’s future without knowing the real story about Latinos in America, and those decisions will have consequences for the country’s future. The national conversation needs to be informed by the facts.

First, Latinos’ purchasing power has been growing 70% faster than Americans’ as a whole since the late 1980s, according to the 2013 Multicultural Report from the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia. That dry statistic is showing up everywhere in the real world. One example: Latinos drove between 33% ( Nissan) and 100% (Honda) of auto makers’ combined retail sales growth in the U.S. in 2014, reports IHS Automotive’s Polk Market data unit. Leaders of U.S. consumer-products companies know this and have geared their growth strategies around Latino consumers.

Second, Latinos are driving net new-business formation in the U.S. According to a study by the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, from 2007-12...

The challenges of the aging population will be greatly mitigated by an expanding, young, immigrant workforce.
Monday, May 16, 2016

Since the November election, there has been much talk in Washington and on the pundit circuit about America's changing demographics, especially the "Latino vote" and the new realities of political campaigning. There has also been considerable wrangling over immigration and what it means for a country that is a nation of immigrants but is more crowded than it once was.

The immigration debate is significant to America's politics and culture, but it is also crucial to the country's economics, a subject that receives too little attention. Let's be blunt: The future wealth and well-being of the American people—the country's economic security, national security, business innovation, GDP growth and status in the global marketplace—require a comprehensive solution to the chronic problems caused by a broken immigration policy. In particular, the status of 11 million unauthorized Latino immigrants now living here must be resolved.

The economics are simple: Latinos spur demand. Seventy percent of the nation's gross domestic product is fueled by consumer spending. That means the Latino population—large, growing and increasingly prosperous—will play a key role in America's economic future.

Latinos are now by far the country's biggest minority-market segment. Including unauthorized residents, the Latino population now exceeds 54 million (not counting nearly four million in Puerto Rico). Blacks, in second place, number 39 million. The Latino population has increased...

Friday, June 17, 2016

Despite our success, it is true that the U.S. has serious challenges in manufacturing.  For example, in 2000,China replaced the U.S. as the world’s second leading exporter, with the EU as number one.  Today, America’s global market share of manufactured exports ranks third (as opposed to total manufacturing, where we still rank first) because our export share has declined from 19 percent in 2000 to less than 14 percent.  Still, during this period, the absolute dollar value of manufactured exports has steadily increased, though less rapidly than exports from China, India and Southeast Asia.

A healthy manufacturing sector requires policy changes at every level.  As global economic competition heats up, we as a country need to do the following to stay competitive:

  • Improve K-12 education,
  • Reform higher education by expanding access and decreasing costs,
  • Increase private sector R&D investment,
  • Upgrade transportation and telecommunications infrastructure,
  • Expand the use of advanced information technologies in every sector,
  • Reform our ...

Testimonials

“He obviously knows his industry pretty well and he’s very much a full-service telco man. He’s got a record and talks well about what he’s achieved.”

Ian Martin, ABN Amro telecommunications analyst

“From Accenture’s global perspective-and based on our work with companies in the Fortune Global 500, Telstra is undertaking an industry-defining transformation program. This is one of the most significant, comprehensive and customer-focused IT and business transformations ever undertaken, and that Accenture has been involved with…this is one of the most complex and comprehensive business transformations, spanning multiple product domains and supporting all network upgrades concurrently. Also; the program is not just about an integrated customer care and billing technology-it also supports the introduction of new, next-generation products, simplifying processes and improving the cultural approach of the organization.”

Bill Green, CEO Accenture

“The role we are normally asked to play sees us doing a lot of systems integration work, we do network work, we do a lot of strategy work, we do a lot of business work. But at Telstra we’re bringing all of that together and it’s unique.”

Ab Krall, Accenture